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Design Shows Take On the Future. And It’s Not Pretty.

Category: Curatorial Practice
A large sculpture in a museum gallery that resembles a bubble

The New York Times examines the trend of museum design exhibitions that portray the future as fraught and ambiguous, replacing the convention of optimistic futurism, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Designs for Different Futures.

“Today, museum curators are promoting the view that conspicuous consumption is bad for the planet, that luxury items exclude those who can’t afford them, and that designers need to acknowledge differently shaped and differently abled bodies. Current shows are meant to provoke conversation, not admiration.”

—Arlene Hirst

Museum curators and mindful millennials seek visions of a "clean," sustainable future. In Philadelphia, designers offer ideas to provoke. PHILADELPHIA - Design isn't what it used to be in the museum world. Just a few years back, exhibitions about the future were typically filled with bright and shiny objects, presented as new ideas to make life better.

Continue Reading at Nytimes

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