Beyond stereotypes: how Iranian art is challenging preconceptions

Category: Exhibitions
Photograph created by Siamak Filizadeh of a woman reclining on an ornate love seat with chickens pecking the floor in front of her.
Siamak Filizadeh – Anis al-Daula. Photograph: Museum Associates / Lacma

Restrictions on freedom of expression have resulted in unconventional and creative ways for Iranian visual artists to use imagery, symbolism and color to explore themes such as identity, politics, faith and gender roles.

Two art exhibitions – one in Los Angeles, the other in New York – have recently opened; one which dispels the misconceptions around Iranian culture, stereotypes and taboos, while the other offers a window into the lives of Iranian women. Both offer insight into how Iran has changed from the past to the present, and perhaps what the future might hold.

-Nadja Sayej

In a country where the law considers homosexuality, drug-related offenses and "insulting the prophet" crimes punishable by the death penalty, freedom of expression in Iran is limited for journalists, activists and artists. However, Iranian art is not all dark and archaic.

Continue Reading at The Guardian

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