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As Nazi objects and fakes enter collectors’ market, should museums show them?

Category: Ethics
a top hat held by a person wearing white gloves

A recent rash of sales of Nazi memorabilia raise questions about dealing in such objects at a time when fascist philosophy is being embraced by populist radicals and demand is fuelling the commerce in fakes.

“If there is no object, there is no debate, there is no discourse, there is no learning.”

–Christian Fuhrmeister

A recent rash of sales of Nazi memorabilia raise questions about dealing in such objects at a time when fascist philosophy is being embraced by populist radicals and demand is fuelling the commerce in fakes. Last month, a Lebanese businessman in Switzerland, Abdalla Chatila, paid around €50,000 at a Munich auction for a top hat said to have been worn by Adolf Hitler.

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